My Background

I have spent my entire career working in the field of antitrust/competition law. I started as an Antitrust Division, USDOJ trial attorney in 1980. I was promoted to Chief of the Philadelphia Field Office in 1994 and retired from government service in 2013. During my time with the Antitrust Division I conducted dozens of cartel investigations, and prosecuted cases through trial and conviction. As Chief, I supervised all matters in the office while still handling some cases myself. I also had input in Antitrust Division policy matters such as Corporate Leniency, Sentencing Guidelines and overall cartel practices.

After leaving the Division I practiced with one of the world’s largest law firms, then with a small group of former Antitrust Division attorneys, and now on my own. As a defense lawyer, I have successfully represented individuals in cartel investigations and other white collar matters such as securities fraud and a very interesting case where the DOJ accused (falsely) our Chinese client of importing counterfeit coins. I also work on the plaintiffs’ side assisting in class actions. I have handled several whistleblower cases which call on my skills and experiences as a government prosecutor. The common denominator in my representation is dealing with the government in an aggressive, but credible manner to achieve a win-win outcome.

I have also been fortunate to be able to pursue a passion of mine—writing and speaking on cartel and compliance issues. My blog, www.cartelcapers.com, has received an ABA top blog award. I also had the honor of being quoted at length by Judge Richard Posner in Motorola Mobility v. AU Optronics, 775 F.3d 816, 826-27 (7th Cir. 2015). I have written many articles on competition compliance drawing on real life examples from my 33 years with the Antitrust Division and shorter time, now in private practice.

 

Cartel Capers Blog

www.cartelcapers.com

I started Cartel Capers after I left the Department of Justice.  One thing I loved about the Antitrust Division, especially when I was in senior management. Was that you always had a chance to express your idea—to be heard.  But, when decisions/policy was made, my job was to implement it and support the policy to the best of my ability.  As an outsider now, I am free to offer comments, write about things I like and things I would change.  I also try to give readers the benefit of my long career in DOJ in explaining why the government does certain things, “inside baseball” so to speak.  The blog also helps me stay current on developments internationally as well as the United States. I love writing the blog because I love competition law and I am quite aware of how lucky I have been to have had a career at the Antitrust Division and now in private practice.

Cartel Capers has been recognized as a Top 100 Blawg by the American Bar Association.  And, I also realized an antitrust attorney’s dream when Cartel Capers was quoted at length by Judge Richard Posner in Motorola Mobility v. AU Optronics, 775 F.3d 816, 826-27 (7th Cir. 2015).

 

 

 

 

 

 

My Background

I have spent my entire career working in the field of antitrust/competition law. I started as an Antitrust Division, USDOJ trial attorney in 1980. I was promoted to Chief of the Philadelphia Field Office in 1994 and retired from government service in 2013. During my time with the Antitrust Division I conducted dozens of cartel investigations, and prosecuted cases through trial and conviction. As Chief, I supervised all matters in the office while still handling some cases myself. I also had input in Antitrust Division policy matters such as Corporate Leniency, Sentencing Guidelines and overall cartel practices.

After leaving the Division I practiced with one of the world’s largest law firms, then with a small group of former Antitrust Division attorneys, and now on my own. As a defense lawyer, I have successfully represented individuals in cartel investigations and other white collar matters such as securities fraud and a very interesting case where the DOJ accused (falsely) our Chinese client of importing counterfeit coins. I also work on the plaintiffs’ side assisting in class actions. I have handled several whistleblower cases which call on my skills and experiences as a government prosecutor. The common denominator in my representation is dealing with the government in an aggressive, but credible manner to achieve a win-win outcome.

I have also been fortunate to be able to pursue a passion of mine—writing and speaking on cartel and compliance issues. My blog, www.cartelcapers.com, has received an ABA top blog award. I also had the honor of being quoted at length by Judge Richard Posner in Motorola Mobility v. AU Optronics, 775 F.3d 816, 826-27 (7th Cir. 2015). I have written many articles on competition compliance drawing on real life examples from my 33 years with the Antitrust Division and shorter time, now in private practice.

 

Cartel Capers Blog

www.cartelcapers.com

I started Cartel Capers after I left the Department of Justice.  One thing I loved about the Antitrust Division, especially when I was in senior management. Was that you always had a chance to express your idea—to be heard.  But, when decisions/policy was made, my job was to implement it and support the policy to the best of my ability.  As an outsider now, I am free to offer comments, write about things I like and things I would change.  I also try to give readers the benefit of my long career in DOJ in explaining why the government does certain things, “inside baseball” so to speak.  The blog also helps me stay current on developments internationally as well as the United States. I love writing the blog because I love competition law and I am quite aware of how lucky I have been to have had a career at the Antitrust Division and now in private practice.

Cartel Capers has been recognized as a Top 100 Blawg by the American Bar Association.  And, I also realized an antitrust attorney’s dream when Cartel Capers was quoted at length by Judge Richard Posner in Motorola Mobility v. AU Optronics, 775 F.3d 816, 826-27 (7th Cir. 2015).